Learn something new every day

If cargo containers could check in and find each other they could collaborate toward a far more efficient shipping experience

People keep asking me what my one takeaway is from time spent in Austin. I imagine they’re looking for some golden nugget of information that I may have gleaned from the conference — something to enlighten us all. But there really isn’t one. Unless it’s this: learn something new every day. Preferably about a subject you may have never given any thought to at all.  Like cargo containers.

If you’ve never delved into the world of cargo containers before you will be surprised at their impact on our economy and environment.  Each ship that carries them puts out more emission particles each year than 50 million cars. Ninety percent of the world’s goods, from apparel to raw materials to agricultural products are shipped in cargo containers. Virtually all of the containers that leave U.S. ports for their voyage back to Asia depart empty. Meanwhile only 10 percent of U.S. companies export anything. That’s a huge opportunity.

Slow the speed of a ship carrying cargo containers from 25 knots to 19 knots and you save $150,000 a day. Eliminate Black Friday and you can slow down an awful lot of those boats.

Interesting stats, click to enlarge: sourced from Tom Stitt of Staxxon via SxSWi

So, you know what the solution is? Social media: a network that connects haulers, shippers, consumer and cargo containers.  If consumers could have more say in what goods they wanted, where they wanted them and when they wanted (or needed) their arrival, it could have a significant affect on the environment. If the newest cargo containers — the kind that fold from 20 feet to 19 inches — could check in with each other, they could reduce the space they need on ships should they have to go back empty. (The new containers need to snap together.)  And if non-exporting companies had more access to the old empty containers, perhaps they’d consider exporting.

Learning stuff like this may not change your life, your business or your way of working.  But it certainly opens your mind to new ways of thinking and connecting ideas. Consider that you might actually have more of a positive impact on the environment by delaying the purchase of a new iPad (allowing it to be shipped more slowly) than by lowering your thermostat. Finally you begin to see new potential in the tools you work with every day.

What did you learn today?

7 comments
avacristi
avacristi

Excellent facts about the ship. Great solution! shipping liner connects products from other markets and cargo container can load a lot products and goods using them it can store products that are easily broken or damaged.

Tom Stitt
Tom Stitt

Ed - Thanks for the blog post. This was my first SXSW presentation. Glad you found it interesting. Tom

JeffShattuck
JeffShattuck

When people think about technical advances of the 20th century, they tend to think about, well, tech. But the container ship has been called one of the greatest factors in globalization by no less that the Economist. Here's a link to an article that talks about the history of these things, several of which glide past my window every DAY. Unreal.

http://www.economist.com/node/5624791?story_id=5624791

joemdesign
joemdesign

That was a right interesting synopsis of the #SXSW talk. Thanks for passing along the wisdom for those who missed it.

moremeyou
moremeyou

That's a great way to sum up what one should/can get out of conferences. Thanks for sharing.

edwardboches
edwardboches moderator

@joemdesign My pleasure.I guess the second half of learning something new is follow and seek what you don't already know. That's what I did at SxSW this year.