Creativity and social media

Today, I gave a webinar for the 4As on creativity in the age of social media. Granted you could get a roomful of people a lot smarter than me and they could debate for hours what it is.  But what the heck, I gave it go.

My basic premise was this: in the days of old media, creativity was epitomized by messages that were clever enough, entertaining enough anPicture 6d memorable enough that we didn’t mind their intrusion into our lives. Better yet they delighted and surprised us when we happened upon them in a magazine or newspaper. Basically they were stories that brands and marketers created, told and delivered. Whether they were “creative” or not was often the difference between our noticing them and paying attention, and tuning them out.

In social media, creativity is something else.  It’s not the stories we tell, it’s the stories we get others to tell for us. Better yet, it’s the stories we get others to create on our behalf.  Obviously this consumer-generated content happens without us.  Everyone’s a creator these days. Yet if we encourage this new word of mouth, if we both stimulate it and welcome it, it may work to our benefit as marketers.
Picture 1But creativity in the age of social media begs lots of questions.  Should it be a gimmick, no matter how good (think Whopper Sacrifice) or a long-lasting platform?  Is creativity in the execution or the thinking that encourages participation?  Should it be determined by applying the old media criteria – award shows that cite executions – or new criteria that have yet to be established?

I asked a few folks who spend a fair amount of time in the social space, or who think about it, for their opinions.  Here they are.

Ben Kunz, Director Strategic Planning, Mediassociates

As I think we’ve discussed before, I believe “creativity in a social media age” is about two major shifts in how memes are seeded and spread in the public. First, marketers can shapeshift the channel — beyond the message. And second, marketers can create a more-human brand.

The “creative” channel shift is obvious. We’ve gone from three networks to the “hundreds” that Jack Trout worried over in 1969 to thousands of cable companies to millions of blogs … to social media. It’s as if singular nodes in the mindhive of humanity were suddenly connected, and the ability to manage (or manipulate) those connections is here at last. We see laborious, ugly attempts with companies such as IZEA (yes, I dislike them more than Starbucks with no Wi-Fi) who try to buy influence among the threaded connections; not just by paying for posts or tweets, but with link-spamming-jamming tactics such as contests to retweet, comment, or reblog crap as long as you spread the message in a chance for a prize. We also see more authentic approaches, still a form of paid manipulation, with Tyson doing goodwill “cause marketing” creating networked contests in exchange for manipulating the network. Others don’t pay to get in, but create shocking buzz to try to seed the memes … CP+B with their secondary shock effects are a good example, or all the hyper-sexed-shocking “viral” seeds planted by agencies on YouTube. What all have in comment are “creative” attempts to manipulate the infrastructure of the communication system, not just the message. It’s somewhat easy to do in the short term, but very difficult to do in the long run … the viral rise and fall of such campaigns is short. Skittles lasted but a moment. And each new attempt to create authentic, genuine buzz tends to be a one-off success, because uniqueness is the driving force of creatively spreading throughout a channel.

The second “creative” more-human brand is most interesting. Yes, Scott Monty gets too much press, but he is the best example of a staid, stodgy old brand (Ford) becoming a human I somewhat care about. Dammit, if my wife needs a new minivan, I will feel guilty now if I do not test drive a Ford. (And from a Toyota family, that is a revelation.) The ability to recast a cold hard brand into a warm human face is a miraculous change, yet it takes immense creativity to pull it off. By creativity, I don’t mean a brand position or message or high concept, but a creative use of a real team of humans to get on Twitter and other channels and present themselves as the real heart of a brand. It’s creativity with a shitload of effort. It’s risk and human souls. Perhaps that’s the most creative endeavor of all.

John Winsor, Author, Crowdsourcer, Entrepreneur

Creativity in the age of social media is all about sparking and participating in conversations. Success is making something go viral. Ideas must not only be great stories that want to be shared but also are shareable. In this new age creativity has been unshackled.  No longer does the elite own it; it is now a commodity. It’s what you do with it and how you communicate it that counts.

Scott Karambis, Director Brand Planning, Amalgamated

Creativity means that everyone and anyone can participate in the power of collective inspiration that was once exclusive to artistic communities.  It means creativity no longer need be a “vocation” or a “calling.”  It can be a behavior.  We’ve long been saying that everyone is creative, but the structure and roles didn’t change, so we didn’t really mean it.  Now, social media has enabled a true democratization of creativity.

CC Chapman, Partner and Creative Director, Campfire NYC

Creativity doesn’t change, but it certainly evolves. In today’s world I think we have even more tools with which to get creative. When it’s done right it invokes a reaction in the viewer (or now the participant).  In the past creativity was solid and stagnant. You created it and people reacted to it. Now you create and it can evolve, continue, be built upon, torn down, mashed up or remixed. The creative process in social media isn’t something that ever ends.

Mike Troiano, President, Holland Mark Digital

I think it goes way beyond marketing communications. It’s about driving the top line with ideas: product ideas, content ideas, channel ideas, distribution ideas.  It’s about insight and understanding what people really need.

You can think about a matrix where the x-axis is what people need, and the y-axis is what people know they need. If people need it and they know they need it, they’ll tell you. So listen.

We’ve spent the last 50 years in the lower quadrant, getting people to “know” they need stuff they really don’t. I think great creative people will live in the upper right quadrant in the age of social media… figuring out what people do need – products, content, connections, even emotions – before the consumer even realizes it.

Nick Pipitone, Creative Director, Jigsaw

There are new aspects of the online experience that are being created all the time. How the consumer interacts with a brand, how a company speaks to its customers, and how customers can contribute is always changing. The creative challenge is to contextualize it in a way that makes all three aspects work seamlessly.

Alex Bogusky, CP&B

Creativity is the same thing it was before social media. But I could never define it then and I wouldn’t want to now.

So what’s your take?  Got a definition of creativity in an age of participation, crowdsourcing, and social media?  If so, please leave  a comment. And as always, if you like the stuff you find here, subscribe either by RSS or email.  There are buttons for that on the upper right of this page. Thanks for stopping by.

44 comments
schultzybeckett
schultzybeckett

Both are  closely interrelated only  a  creative  person  can  undestand  the  needs  skills  and responsibilities  reqired  in  the  social  media  field because  being creative  means that  u  r having  an  extra  mental  edge  over  the  othe  people so  one  is able  to  comprehand  the  problems  and  situations  in  a better  manner

Schultzy @ http://fourquadrant.com/

Help Desk Management
Help Desk Management

Creativity is generally thought of as self-expression; but if you unravel the process a bit, you'll find something much deeper and more profoundly transformational at its core. The true creative process is born of a deep inner yearning to be used in a way you, yourself, find resonant with the good, the true and the beautiful. It's often felt as a strong pull you simply cannot ignore... a compelling magnetism that draws you deeper toward the realization of your inborn potential. It's something we all long to experience because we instinctively know it makes us feel alive and connected to something greater than ourselves. Without it, the world seems mundane, ordinary and tedious.
.-= Help Desk Management´s last blog ..Importance Of Help Desk Outsourcing And A Thing To Consider =-.

Debbie Lattuga
Debbie Lattuga

I think that creativity is the approach you need to take with social media. It's and evolving media, and what worked last year may not work this year. So you've got to be flexible and change.

Gary Vaynerchuk speaks about 'Twitter' in his book "Crush It". For the last 2 years, he devoted a lot of his time to Twitter, but feels Facebook is the up and comer. All because of the deeper relationships that can be cultivated.
.-= Debbie Lattuga´s last blog ..Make a Collage Vision Board =-.

Bruce DeBoer
Bruce DeBoer

If asked how social media will change creativity, my auto-response is nearly identical to @bogusky so I’ll change the question thus permitting my more typical long form answer: "How is creativity going to be applied with the emergence of social media."

Please forgive me if this sounds remedial but I’m a photographer not a marketing guy. Additionally, I hope this isn’t simply a restatement of what everyone else said, but I think the strongest response to the new-ish media landscape is to inspire communities with our own creativity and invite them to participate any way you can. To do this we'll need to broaden our thinking about where we find our own creativity and who we let participate.

The goal – as I see it – is to present our creativity in such a compelling way as to inspire individuals to engage their network. This sounds similar to “old school” approaches because it is, albeit with a tweak here or there.

My new mantra is "message follows motivation". I think the difference is in the bandwidth with which communities are able to broadcast their response. If we lose the opportunity to inspire individuals to speak our message and ignite their community, someone else will.

Furthermore, I think it's important to understand that the creative pie is getting larger while simultaneously being divided into smaller slices. The orchestra has added more players but at the same time the orchestra leader is more important than ever.

I believe over a relatively short time the newness will feel familiar. Excite opinion leaders with greatness so they add your value to theirs. The biggest challenge is to learn the new channels.
.-= Bruce DeBoer´s last blog ..Create Intangible Satisfaction – Rory Sutherland =-.

Len Kendall
Len Kendall

I don't know what creative expression does for other people but for me personally...

Creativity is evident to me (past and present) when I am put into a mindset of wishing either I had created "it" first, or having the mental and physical capability to do so at all.
.-= Len Kendall´s last blog ..Social Media Savvy is a Cheap Commodity =-.

Tony Long
Tony Long

To be creative in the age of social media involves mastering the speed of inputs that surround you, which therefore suggests more emphasis on synthesis and less time for evolution.

But don't despair: original thought can still derive from cut-and-paste methodology.

Arafat Kazi
Arafat Kazi

"Getting others to tell their stories" is awesome because in my very limited experience, I've always believed in creating involvement. This is also an integral part of grassroots development. By "grassroots development" I mean any crowd-sourced or crowd-powered activity which benefits the greater population. Your Timberland website linking to jobs is an example of that. I feel that no social project will be really successful over the long term unless there's some sort of social improvement motive built in, because of the intrinsic nature of social media.

That being said, I think that the holy grail of advertising or of any creative industry really, is the work of the solitary genius or team of geniuses. I'm not saying that we should emulate Ogilvy sitting at his desk getting drunk and writing about Rolls Royce. What I mean is that the crowd didn't, couldn't, write Paradise Lost, or invent the Marlboro Man.

Social media at its best is like the apotheosis of focus groups and market research, though this is an imperfect analogy because social media is much, much, _much_ more. But the genius, what the genius does is come up with a hidden, secret treasure, an insight that NOBODY ELSE KNEW. And that's what changes the world.

I think that that needs a lot of courage, even insanity. And true genius of course lies in finding that secret treasure and inciting the mob to storm the Bastille or engage with a brand. But it's indefinable, this creativity thing. And the crowd will always need visionaries.

I get this way whenever I watch a Twilight Zone episode, because Rod Serling engaged in every one of these conversations before any of us.

David Saxe
David Saxe

Agreed on the misuse of manipulate.

Did Gary generate a new idea or did he simply identify a problem? I'm sure many before him realized this problem but either lacked the motivation or creativity to do anything about it. Seems to me that the creativity is in the solution (not just the execution, but the solution itself).
.-= David Saxe´s last blog ..It’s Not About You. Make Sure We Get That Message =-.

David Saxe
David Saxe

in our context and put simply, I would say that creativity is the ability to manipulate emotion.

The emotions we encourage are too many to count but the one response I fear the most is indifference. In the current networked age, our stories may be the same but they're a lot easier to ignore, so the legs are just as important as the body. Though Ben's comments are intriguing. If we're too focused on the legs (how we're carrying the story) maybe we're compromising authenticity.
.-= David Saxe´s last blog ..It’s Not About You. Make Sure We Get That Message =-.

Sam Reid
Sam Reid

Maybe one can take a step back to get a wider view of the question.

Content people choose to share and respond to has an intrinsic positive glow. This can be either because it has a practical use, is simply entertaining, or a bit of both. If a brand is involved, they'll receive part of that glow, and this is the reward, to be part of the positive conversation & not the owner of it.

People become fans of culture not advertising so perhaps creativity in social media is the ability to produce content which is culturally relevant. Maybe we need to look beyond the skills of traditional agency staff and incorporate the wider talent spectrum?

Sam Reid
Sam Reid

Maybe one can take a step back to get a wider view of the question.

Content people choose to share and respond to has an intrinsic positive glow. This can be either because it has a practical use, is simply entertaining, or a bit of both. If a brand is involved, they'll receive part of that glow, and this is the reward, to be part of the positive conversation & not the owner of it.

People become fans of culture not advertising so perhaps creativity in social media is the ability to produce content which is culturally relevant. Maybe we need to look beyond the skills of traditional agency staff and incorporate the wider talent spectrum?

Scott Karambis
Scott Karambis

Intriguing collection of responses, Edward. Strikes me that the conversation might be sharpened if we differentiate creativity in service of a brand from creativity that is not. Creativity as a human drive is, by definition, boundless. But--Alex's evasiveness notwithstanding--as a commercial act, as a product in the market, creativity has a historical specificity, as particular as detergent or cell phones or life coaches. One that is evolving before our eyes. And I think you've hit on a crucial element of this evolution with your definition, Edward. Happy capitalists might see this decentralized production of creative work as a source of accelerated growth (and lowered costs). A dour Marxist, however, might argue we have outsourced the work of ideological reproduction (aka reification) to the consumer's themselves, who seem happy to do the work for us.

c_b_
c_b_

Your post and the comments are all invigorating. What I love most about creativity in the social media realm is that we (marketers,advertisers, brands, etc.) may give birth to an idea but it's the community that sculpts it into something truly inspirational. Even better, we have to constantly top their final work when we brainstorm our next campaign concept.

Todd
Todd

Think it's tough now, wait until robots outnumber humans. Ever try selling beer to something that has aquaphobia?

Mariano
Mariano

Wow. How appropriate that you should mention "getting others to tell stories for us." I was thinking to myself a few weeks ago that it would be great to be able to create a free clinic for small businesses in my area to help them learn and express how they could use social media for their business. Got a great turnout for the meeting, and did a couple of interviews of owners on what they got out of the clinic.

So I took the interviews, did some minor editing, and put them up on my site. I feel great mostly because I'm getting these businesses to really think about how they can use social media and then sharing those ideas with others. I actually hope I can make it a series that will evolve with the stuff that's available on the web.

The key is to make the interviews short and hopefully get just one or two businesses out there to think, "hey, that's a great idea, I should try that!"

Thanks for this post, makes me feel I'm on the right track!
.-= Mariano´s last blog ..The Web and You Presents: Small Business, Big Voices =-.

MDavid Low
MDavid Low

Wonderful presentation today, had most of Toth in attendance for it. Thank you for your unique perspective.

Keith Miks
Keith Miks

Edward, great presentation... Really enjoy seeing this POV and several agency thought leaders adding to these kinds of discussion. Talking about it, experimenting with it and jumping right in seems to be the better ways to creatively innovate social media. Basically, by being conversational however we can becomes the online creative conversation to gain new perspectives and insights outside of our typical day.

Mel Exon
Mel Exon

Stick 'define: creativity' into Google and this is what you get as the top two responses:

1. "the ability to create" (er, yes)

2. "Creativity is a mental and social process involving the generation of new ideas or concepts, or new associations of the creative mind between existing ideas or concepts..."

It's obvious stuff, but a reminder that creativity at its heart involves the generation of something new. Plain and simple. The responsibility for that has not gone away, just because we now operate in a wonderfully networked world. Creativity still involves sparking, curating & fueling fantastic conversations and stories about the brands we work with.

The beauty of social media? That sort of currency can't be bought, needn't be bought. Real creativity combined with some smart propagation will earn it. Or to put it another way, the proof of creativity in an age of social media is viral (an over-used and abused word, but one I just keep coming back to time and again these days).
.-= Mel Exon´s last blog ..Mary Meeker’s Economy & Internet Trends Presentation 2009 =-.

scottRcrawford
scottRcrawford

...is about finding our most passionate users where they experience the brand in full-on lust, then enabling them with the things/platform they need to share the love. To serve is to lead.

Rich Nadworny
Rich Nadworny

It's like what the supreme court says about pornography - I know it when I see it.

Seriously, creativity is the ability to make people think and feel new things. That's what great art, movies and literature do.

And it's what marketers strive to. The need for creativity hasn't gone away just because the 30 second spot is less relevant.

Bruce DeBoer
Bruce DeBoer

That means a lot coming from you Edward. Thank you.

I think one point that is often missed is that opinion leaders express their opinions for selfish reasons first. They may like the brand, they may love their community, but if they send brilliance into their network, it makes them look equally as brilliant.
.-= Bruce DeBoer´s last blog ..Can I Get a Witness? =-.

edward boches
edward boches

Bruce:

Good stuff, lots of quotable comments. My faves:
"If we lose the opportunity to inspire individuals to speak our message and ignite their community, someone else will."

"Excite opinion leaders with greatness so they add your value to theirs."

Thanks

edward boches
edward boches

I think it's also possible that the speed and multiple inputs can inspire instant ideas and certainly fresh ways of looking at things, so that creativity (figuring out what's possible now) needn't been limited to cut and paste. More input doesn't always mean more ideas, but in many cases it can lead to them.

edward boches
edward boches

Arafat:
You have a vivid imagination yourself. See, this is what I'm talking about.

Arafat Kazi
Arafat Kazi

To clarify: great auteurs working in high art in the interactive medium, because I just re-read my comment and realized that there actually _are_ several great minds working in the interactive medium.

I was reading Philip Roth's "Portnoy's Complaint" a week or two ago. If that had been a book written today, can you even begin to imagine what its interactive campaign would have been like? Oh god, crowdsourced confession websites, iPhone apps that would never get approved (because of lewdness) and, for the truly perverse, an old media integration: branded organic liver.

Arafat Kazi
Arafat Kazi

That's a question that boggles the mind. No doubt we'll see great minds working in the interactive medium in coming years.

That is the most interesting question, actually. Because what about the artistic possibilities, really? I have no idea, though it's all exciting. Just the idea of the crowd working in the cloud for music alone blows my mind. All those projects where someone plays a drum track in Sweden and then they pair it up with a bass guitar from Zimbabwe, and it all comes together in a symbiotic whole!

And here's the kicker: it's going to get MORE involved, MORE collaborative, the possibilities are going to get even MORE elaborate. We click and type and take pictures now, but we'll have so many more input vehicles as time goes by. What an exciting time to live in!!!!

edward boches
edward boches

No doubt the solitary "genius" will always prevail, though we use that word too loosely. Shakespeare, Mozart, Picasso, were geniuses. Ogvily maybe have been smart, even brilliant, but he was far from being a genius. That being said, there seem to be two things that social offers us. One, the chance to see what the crowd or co-creation might generate, and equally important, give the individual creator access to and energy from the community, both of which might help with the realization of something amazing. Finally, if you think about the auteur in film, from Fellini to Truffaut to Woody Allen, et. al. they imagined, wrote, directed and achieved in a one way medium. If they could or did work in a more interactive one, what might they have imagined and produced?

Arafat Kazi
Arafat Kazi

Errr I should also add I really thought about the solitary genius versus crowd because I saw a trailer for Star Wars Uncut, which is the crowd-sourced Star Wars movie. It's pretty amazing, you should check it out because I would really love to see what you have to say about it.

Scott Karambis
Scott Karambis

Are we starting to stray pretty far from "creativity's" meaning--in a marketing context--for it to mean much beyond a new idea about any aspect of a business: distribution (as in the example above), organizational structure, debt-management? I like your definition, Edward, because inspiring people to tell our stories extends our field into the consumer-mediated digital landscape, but is still something about which we, as marketers/creatives, can conceivably claim some expertise. We understand consumer behavior, we know how to inspire people and we know how stories operate in culture. We know considerably less about off-shore funding vehicles and supply-chain management. Some agencies have thought otherwise, and attempted to launch their own products. Their results so far have not been terribly impressive. But maybe I lack vision on this front, too enraptured by the "aura" of the traditional creative product, an imagination made manifest.

edward boches
edward boches

Agree. "The fact that he came up with the idea of making wine accessible to everyone." That is the solution to (if not a problem) an opportunity. A "creative" way of looking at the world of wine, marketing, potential of social media, etc. The videos themselves may or may not have intrinsic glow. But Gary and his idea do.

edward boches
edward boches

Manipulate strikes me as the wrong word and the antithesis of transparency. Inspire or evoke are more appropriate. What I'm interested in moving beyond is the old, traditional definition of creative as applied in our business (clever execution) and extending it to the ways we connect, accomplish, reach, and create conversation. What's creative, Gary Vaynerchuk's videos? Or the fact that he came up with the idea of making wine accessible to everyone. I say the latter. And, with the tools to produce and distribute now available to all, we can imagine in new ways. Not to deny the intrinsic glow or the magic of a story we want to share, but in the age of social media,this other stuff is equally deserving of the label "creativity."

Sam Reid
Sam Reid

Thinking of a brand which wishes to 'own' the conversation evokes an analogy of a person at a party who insists on all the attention. Whilst everyone else may listen (or have to listen), they invariably leave the party feeling perplexed by the loudmouth's incognizant lack of 'glow'.

(good point on positive not being relevant.....perhaps negative glow would be a kind of anti matter!)

edward boches
edward boches

Sounds like an idea in there, Sam. Must say I like the idea of the "intrinsic glow." Not sure there's such a thing as a negative glow, so I will use your phrase without it. And, of course, credit you for it. Also, part of the conversation vs owning it is another wise piece of advice, though a hard pill for some brands to swallow. The trick for marketers is learning to inspire it, stimulate it, welcome it without exploiting it.

edward boches
edward boches

Scott:
I have been looking at this from the narrow definition of creativity as it applies to marketing and the evolution of messages (now becoming conversations, memes, viral movements.) In the past we looked at creativity as cleverness; an attention getting message that felt fresh, fun, new, different, unexpected, provocative, and on rare occasion, culturally influential. You have been looking at something even more significant: the impact of all of this technology on creators (artists, painters, poets, writers, etc.) So yes, there are two ways to come at (most of this discussion seems to be about the former), in which case it's possible that the creativity isn't merely in what the crowd generates but in the stimulus we invent to inspire the crowd. That's a whole new kind of commercial creative focus. Your studies and writing, which are even more interesting, will, no doubt, yield even more complex questions before they unveil answers. Hope you're having as much fun as I am exploring all of this.

edward boches
edward boches

c_b_: True. As you can see from some of the comments in the post, there are lots of variations, but they all start with the acknowledgment that it's not about creating everything ourselves; it's about what the community does. Maybe we can inspire them with nothing more than an honest, authentic blog post. Or maybe we need the most originally conceived meme ever to jump start the process.

edward boches
edward boches

Sounds to me like you absolutely are. Check out some of the content at Hub Spot if you haven't already.

edward boches
edward boches

I guarantee that the more you use it the more new ideas will pop into your head. The pallet is larger, the colors more vivid, and the dimensions more interesting. But you've got to get out there.

edward boches
edward boches

That's why I said Ben is "one of smartest folks I've met out here." We, in our business, have a narrow definition of what is creative. Art and copy. A lot of us -- Big Spaceship's Michael Lebowitz, CP&B's Alex Bogusky, me -- are big believers that everyone is and should (or could) be creative. Certainly everyone in our business should be. If creativity is problem solving, and social media, networks, conversation, technology are the new canvas, then ideally we'll see new expressions.

Mel Exon
Mel Exon

Returning to this again. Perhaps there's a more challenging question in whether brands now need open, inclusive corporate cultures with great customer service much more than they'll ever need again the 'creativity' they habitually employ to wrap up their promises. Perhaps unsurprisingly, my answer would be: most businesses need both. A warm, humane approach & an appetite for grinding human endeavour are undoubtedly essential to any company, particularly those wanting to use new social tools online. However, for me this doesn't encompass the inspiration, the originality, dare I say the art, that I associate with the word creativity - even in a commercial context. There's still room for heartstoppingly brilliant beauty & wit, whether it's in great copy, design or user experience or, at a deeper level, a fresh take on what that brand stands for (yes, its 'high concept) that is motivating, galvinising, even moving. We're pretty evolved as human beings by now, we like that stuff too. Indeed, if Ben Kunz's words had been written on behalf of a brand, they'd be living proof.
.-= Mel Exon´s last blog ..Mary Meeker’s Economy & Internet Trends Presentation 2009 =-.

Mel Exon
Mel Exon

Agree. If we're looking for something pithier (aren't we always?) perhaps the word is simply "social". A social idea is one we want to pass around, wish we'd had ourselves, want to play with, discuss etc. In fact I think social ideas are probably more interesting than the term social media (Facebook, Twitter etc are phenomena on an epic scale, sure, but the channels & technology are less interesting than the behaviour & human interaction they encourage).

I also just want to say how struck I am by @BenKunz's piece which you recently added to this post - the final paragraph of which bears repeating:

"The ability to recast a cold hard brand into a warm human face is a miraculous change, yet it takes immense creativity to pull it off. By creativity, I don’t mean a brand position or message or high concept, but a creative use of a real team of humans to get on Twitter and other channels and present themselves as the real heart of a brand. It’s creativity with a shitload of effort. It’s risk and human souls. Perhaps that’s the most creative endeavor of all."

It makes me briefly wonder about the difference between (what I perceive to be) creativity in its entire sense versus great customer service, say, but I really, really don't care. It's inspiring stuff.
.-= Mel Exon´s last blog ..Mary Meeker’s Economy & Internet Trends Presentation 2009 =-.

edward boches
edward boches

Great summary. Since viral is over-used, I like the expression "inspire others to tell stories for us." Viral presumes it happens by itself. Inspire suggests we have to make it happen, or at least allow it and encourage it.

Rich Nadworny
Rich Nadworny

Oops. Yes Bob Garfield has the wrong Groucho clip on his site. Rather than "I'm against it" he should have "Hello I must be going"
.-= Rich Nadworny´s last blog ..What If the IAB Ran the Government? =-.

edward boches
edward boches

Couldn't agree more. In fact, while the Bob Garfield's of the world predict our demise, this is the greatest creative opportunity ever.

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