Boston’s FutureM: Will it be the next big event?

There are an awful lot of great digital and social gatherings. SxSWi. PSFK. Internet Week. But I’m pretty excited that this year Boston is about to try something new with the launch of FutureM.

Thanks to the inspiration of a bunch of really smart people including folks like Brian Halligan, David Meerman Scott, and the leadership of MITX (one of the country’s premiere Internet business and marketing associations), Boston will host an event that has the potential to define “what’s new and what’s next” as FutureM gathers leading thinkers in marketing, media and technology for five days in October.

There will be keynotes, panels, workshops, tweet-ups and, of course, parties. Plans are still in the early stages but what’s pretty cool is the collaboration and excitement already being generated.

Chris Brogan’s Inbound Marketing Summit at Gillette Stadium is part of the event. Hubspot’s user conference takes place the same week.  MIT’s Technology Review will showcase its future view of media.  And a lot of other people, including Mike Volpe are working on ideas, panels and presentations as you read this.

I’m thrilled to be a small part of it. I just started collaborating with the super smart Mike Troiano on a panel about change, transformation, and how to specifically overcome obstacles in order to get more digital and social. We’re hoping to avoid the tired old conversation of what’s not working and put some real specific recommendations on the table for both agencies and brands.

Kiki Mills, the executive director of MITX, has asked me to organize a TNGG (nextgreatgeneration.com) session where we get some really bright, social savvy Gen Y marketers to talk about how companies will have to engage with their generation in the future and how they predict marketing tactics and programs will evolve to align with their behavior.

It would be great to bring in people like Michelle Lauto to get a first hand POV about how this generation looks at media as its own tool for connection and change.

And finally, I’m hoping to moderate, or at least help recruit, a panel of the most forward thinking brands around. What makes them different?  How do they get management sign off on ambitious and untested ideas? Do they use a different set of metrics and evaluation criteria? Are their lawyers more open-minded?

It’s still too early to share specifics. And suffice it to say I’m both excited and anxious about it being great. But as I’ve learned from hanging with the digital and social crowd, this community works together. It’s collaborative. And it helps each other experiment, learn and ultimately succeed. It’s why I’ve volunteered to help.

So join us. Plan to attend. Submit events. Comment on this post. Leave suggestions for who and what you’d like to see and hear. And if you have ideas for any of the above panels, please let me know.

5 comments
melinda wax
melinda wax

Any thoughts about having a panel on education? Design education is being massively revised to accommodate what is happening in the market/industry, but not all design schools are choosing to change in the same way. What does the industry want from their newest recruits? Are they finding what they need now? What advice could working professionals offer to educators about how to create curriculum that matches the the current (and constantly changing) marketplace? On the job training or hit the ground running? How can the education of designers, managers, and creatives best serve the industries in which they will seek employment upon graduation? Masters degree needed or preference for experience on the job for a rookie vs two more years of "philosophical" education in design/management/marketing/etc.?

Kiki Mills
Kiki Mills

Edward

Thank you for the post and we are thrilled for your encouragment. The feedback so far has been incredibly positive to have a platform to rally around the intellectual capital and horsepower here in MA. YOu are right, it will take a few years for sure. But as we all know good content sells itself, and it's clear in feeling the collective enthusiam from people like yourself, that FutureM has been long overdue. Thanks for playing a role.

Jaime Reynolds
Jaime Reynolds

We're excited and anxious about it being great too! But it can only be great with the help of leaders like you, thank you for your support and all that you are doing to make it the next big marketing conference.

Michael Troiano
Michael Troiano

Honored to be a part of it, Edward. Let's do something great.

edward boches
edward boches

Takes a lot of people to make something good. Need content, venues, participants, PR, and a community that people want to be part of. Will probably take a few years, but what the heck, should be both fun and worthwhile.